Archive for PLR Profit

Insider Tips On Launching Profit Getting Video Products – Free eBook

Video Product Perfection

Video products are another way of creating product awareness and promoting one’s business through the product. The video production is meant to showcase moving images to be done on electronic media.

Similar to filmmaking it only defers to the images being recorded
electronically rather than on film stock.

In this eBook, you will Get all the info you needed.

Insider Tips On Launching Profit Getting Video Products

  • Video Product Basics
  • Choosing Your Target Market And Subject
  • Visualize Your Complete Product, Write Your
    Script And Obtain Graphics
  • Choose And Learn Your Editing Software
  • Record Audio
  • Assemble Video
  • Supply A Sample And Make It Viral
  • Launch Your Final Product

Video Product Basics

Using this innovative tool there is a platform available for creating
content, video editing and delivering a finished video product for
various mediums of exposure.

For the online marketer who cost concerns are high on the priority
list, this form of creating material to promote the intended item can be quite a welcomed respite. In almost all cases the video product can be competitively cost-effective and definitely cheaper than other tools for promotional use.

The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 27

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

There are some cautions when you are using private label rights to make money. The first is that having private label rights does NOT ensure that you have the copyrights. This can be tricky since copyrights are generally granted when a document is finished. That being said, a writer could sell you part of a document and claim that it is not necessarily finished, therefore denying you the copyrights. Also, by purchasing part of the private label rights you are not guaranteed the right to re-sell the material or allow others the license to re-print it. It is important to verify the rules of the contract between you and the author.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 26

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Since cashing in on the uses of Private Label Rights can be done through all digital products including articles, e-books, graphic templates, and software, as the writer there are great ways to make money with not just articles, but with e-books. If you write an e-book, there are generally many sections, or chapters, within said ebook. That being said, you can then sell part of the rights, as the writer, to chapters or sections or the entire e-book to a company who will then resell it to their clients with their name on the content. You can do this repeatedly as the writer and make money by selling individual pieces to many companies within your niche market. The people who buy part of the rights can sell your content as their own. This is especially useful for freelancers who can rewrite content they have purchased or written for repeat clients numerous times, instead of “spinning” material found on the internet.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 25

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Since cashing in on the uses of Private Label Rights can be done through all digital products including articles, e-books, graphic templates, and software, as the writer there are great ways to make money. Taking articles for example, as the writer, you can utilize the articles which you write as a means of generating income by selling part of the rights to numerous clients. Since articles can cover a variety of measures, it is important to find a niche market and cover that in great detail. The more articles you can write in a particular niche market, the more you have to offer competing companies in that market. You can locate article directories such as Ezine.com as well as market your materials to websites, blogs, eBooks, or other writing sectors of a particular website or host. You sell part of the rights which means that the host is allowed to take your articles and distribute them on their website to their clients with their name on it. However, since you still retain the rights to the materials in part as the author, you are able to sell the partial rights, yet again, to another consumer. You allow them to rewrite the content as many times as they want after they have paid you for the rights. By using private label rights for things such as blogs, you can continue to direct traffic to your site as the buyer.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 24

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Cashing in on the uses of Private Label Rights can be done through all digital products including articles, e-books, graphic templates, and software. Since there are generally many buyers for the same product, the price of a single product is lower than creating a similar product from scratch. However, the distribution of purchasing private label content is limited, which minimizes competing marketers from using the same content.

A license allows buyers to re-brand content as their own, under their own name, so long as it is not under copyright. The practice means that content can be modified, sold, sold again, or re-purposed in different formats. Buyers, in certain cases, are able to resell the same rights or transfer them. Marketers can use private label rights to resell their own written content through article directories, ebook directories, content syndication, or slide-sharing websites.

To successfully cash-in on the use of private label rights, while minimizing workload as well as production time includes using adding perceived value to items that are existing through either bonuses or limited time offers. With private label content, there are different rights distributed from the developer so thoroughly checking the license before using the content to make money is important.

Making money from private label rights has seen some criticism as work can be distributed to multiple customers without the work being exclusive or unique. However, as the owner of products, this is the easiest way to make money. You sell some of the rights to your work to many customers at once who then distribute it under their brand.

In order to utilize these money-making tactics, it is important to understand the economics, history, technology, and globalization behind it.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 23

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

In addition to having clearly identifiable effects on the physical environment, technology has also had an unmistakable effect on human interaction. The modern world has seen communications tools and media platforms explode in diversity and accessibility. For instance, the Internet allows people to shop for anything they might want from anywhere in the world.

Email allows almost instantaneous communication between people that might be half a world apart, and GPS technology has enabled greater ease of travel, as well as providing benefits for search and rescue operations and more. GIS, or geographic information systems, technology has merged the fields of cartography, database design and statistical analysis to make all types of new things possible.

Technology like new medical equipment and procedural advances have also had a profound effect on the world. Changing trade patterns have also impacted societies around the world, at all levels of development. For instance, China is emerging from a once-backward nation to become the world leader in terms of technology production – thanks to increased manufacturing and a lessening of government restriction in a few key areas.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 22

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Trade allows us to specialize in doing what we do best. The gain from trade is based on comparative advantage and not on absolute advantage. When each person specializes in producing the good for which he/she has a comparative advantage, total production in the economy rises. This increase in the overall size of the economic pie can be used to make everyone better off.

Remember that comparative advantage reflects the relative opportunity cost. Trade can benefit everyone in society because it allows people to specialize in activities in which they have the comparative advantage. This implies that the gains from trade can be tremendous.

If you consider how the global or international market can really support comparative advantages, it is easy to see why international trade tends to continually flourish. In fact, most economies are interdependent on the other economies around the world.

Today, it is common for any particular good to be produced by the country that has the smaller opportunity cost for producing it. This is because this will always strengthen the economy in general by allowing all participants to benefit from their trade activities.

For example, the farmer gets 5 ounces of meat in exchange for 15 ounces of potatoes. In other words, the farmer buys each ounce of meat for a price of 3 ounces of potatoes. This price of meat is lower than its opportunity cost for 1 ounce of meat which is 4 ounce of potatoes. Thus, the farmer benefits from the trade.

Overall, international trade has quickly become an easily accessible form of making money, thanks to technological advances and the many modes of communication.

Infrastructure is an important consideration in economic patterns and activities, as well. If the right level of technology, communication and transportation are not available, then different businesses will not be able to locate to a particular region. For instance, manufacturing requires that there be a highly developed transportation network to ensure a steady supply of raw materials and easy shipment of completed products.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 21

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

The result of imperialism and the Industrial Revolution has been the creation of a global economy. However, that creation has not been without issues. Global economization has created a network in which a problem in one area leads to issues in another area on the other side of the globe.

For instance, the decision by OPEC to raise the price of crude oil led to skyrocketing fuel prices around the world. Other symptoms of the global economy include the way that wars, famines and droughts affect the planet as a whole. National debt in Latin America has led to an increased crime rate and is one of the major factors in the drug trade, which affects nations around the world.

The global economy is also affected by technological innovation, and increasing communications methods. However, these are not distributed evenly around the world. Areas of Africa and Asia, for instance, still do not even have basic electricity and water, while other areas have an overabundance of goods and services.

Satellite technology, computers, and even the television are also part of the global economy and the flow of information from one part of the globe to another. In fact, it is these technological innovations that have allowed the global economy to evolve as far as it has.

Thanks to these technological innovations, the uses of private label rights were created. Without them, people would not be able to exchange information in such an instant capacity nor would they be able to utilize the selling and promotion of said information.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 20

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Pure Competition

By now, you understand that a market requires business owners, consumers, and a basic economic structure or model to follow. The most common types of markets include those that are pure competition, monopolistic, oligopolies, and monopolies.

A purely competitive market is as a market in which no individual business can influence the market price on its own. In this type of market, it is industry in general that creates the influence. The interaction between the industry and buyers determines the price. An individual firm takes prices as given and then decides how much to sell at this price. This is why an individual firm is called price taker.

Pure Competition markets all have the following distinguishing characteristics:

  • Large number of buyers and sellers: The number of sellers is so large that output by an individual seller is an insignificant proportion of the total output of the industry.
  • All firms produce homogeneous products: Goods produced by different firms are homogeneous so that all the buyers are willing to pay the same price for the products of all producers of a good. So, no producer is in a position to charge a different price of the product it produces. A uniform price prevails in the market.
  • There is perfect knowledge about market and technology: This means that all producers and consumers are fully informed about the market. So, no consumer is prepared to pay a price higher than what is being charged in other parts of the market. Also, no producer sells its product at a price lower than the price charged by other producers simply because he is fully informed about the market. Each business has perfect knowledge about the technology. Each producer is aware of all the available techniques for producing a good. All of these details ensure the same per unit cost by all the firms in the industry.
  • Freedom of entry and exit to firms: There are no obstacles in the way of new businesses joining the industry or existing ones leaving it. This ensures that there are neither above average profits, nor exorbitant losses by any firm over the proverbial long run. In the “short run”, however, profits and losses are possible because during this period firms are not in a position to enter or leave the industry. If firms are making profits, new firms enter and raise the total supply of the industry. This reduces market price and can reduce profits. Over the long term firms are incurring losses; the existing firms start leaving the industry; and this reduces the total supply. This raises prices till any losses are eliminated.

A monopoly is a market situation in which there is only one firm producing a good, or in which a single business seems to dominate the entire market.

Monopoly markets all have the following distinguishing characteristics:

  • A single seller: There is only one producer of a product. It may be due to some natural conditions prevailing in the market, or may be due to some legal restrictions in the form of patent, copyright, sole dealership, state monopoly etc. Since there is only one seller, any change in the supply plan of that seller can have substantial influence above the market price.
  • No close substitute: A producer faces competition from its substitutes. A good may have many substitutes, but not all substitutes offer competition. The substitutes which are too costly and inconvenient do not offer any competition. Such substitutes can be called “distant substitutes”. The substitutes that can be conveniently used in place of the given product, and which are available at a  similar price, offer competition. These may be called “close substitutes”. A monopoly market has no such close substitutes, and does not face any competition.
  • No freedom of entry: There is no freedom for the new firms to enter the industry. This may be due to some government order. For example, production of many defense goods can be seen as monopoly of the government due to national security considerations. Similarly, production of some public utility goods is also monopoly of states in the US. For example, electricity, water supplies, etc. are often called state monopolies.

Monopolistic competition is a situation in which the market is basically a competitive market but with some elements of a monopoly as well.

  • Large number of buyers and sellers: The number of sellers is so large that output by an individual seller is an insignificant proportion of the total output of the industry. As such any change in the output plan of a single producer, assuming that there is no change in output by other producers, has a negligible effect on total output and hence no influence on the market price. Similarly, the number of buyers is so large that an individual buyer purchases an insignificant proportion of the total output sold in the market. As such any change in quantity demand of other buyers has negligible impact on total market demand and hence no influence on market price. To sum up, no individual seller or an individual buyer is able to influence the market price on its own.
  • Firms produce differentiated goods: It implies that buyers differentiate among the products of different firms. It may be on account of different brand names, packing, color, shape, and the friendly behavior of the seller or any other consideration. These differentiated products are close substitutes of each other. Since a group of buyers prefers the product of a particular producer, that producer enjoys some monopoly in the product and is in a position to influence in the market for it. This makes monopolistic competition different from pure competition.
  • Firms have perfect knowledge about market and technology: All producers have the perfect knowledge about the market price and the technology. All consumers also have the knowledge about the market so that they can conveniently shift from one substitute to another in the event of bigger price difference in the products of different firms.
  • Freedom of entry and exit to the firms: There are no obstacles in the way of new firms joining the industry or existing firms leaving the industry. This ensures that there are neither above average profits, nor tremendous losses by any firm in the long run. In the short run, profits and losses are possible because during this period firms are not in a position to enter or leave the industry. If firms are making profits, new firms enter and raise the total supply of the industry. This reduces market price and wipes out profits. However, in the long run firms are incurring losses. The existing firms start leaving the industry and reduce the total supply. This raises the price until all the losses are wiped out.

Oligopoly is an important form of imperfect competition where there are few (two to ten in most cases) sellers in the market selling homogeneous or differentiated product.

Oligopoly markets all have the following distinguishing characteristics:

  • Interdependence: The most important feature of oligopoly is interdependence in decision making between the few firms which comprise the entire industry. This is because when the number of competitors is few, any change in price, output, or advertising technique by a firm will have a direct effect on the fortune of rivals who will then retaliate by changing their own prices, outputs or advertising techniques as the case may be.
  • Importance of advertising and selling costs: A direct effect of interdependence of oligopolists is that the various firms have to employ various aggressive and defensive marketing weapons to gain a greater share in the market or to maintain their share. For this, various firms have to incur a good deal of costs on advertising and other measures of sales promotion.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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The Easy Way to Profit from Private Label Rights Material Chapter 19

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Money is anything that is generally accepted as a medium of exchange, store of value, a unit of account and standard of deferred payment.

The functions of money will always include:

  • A medium of exchange, which means money as a payment for exchange of goods and services.
  • A store of value, which means that money is an asset and can be stored for use in future.
  • As unit of accounts, meaning as a standard unit for accounting prices. It makes money a powerful medium of comparing prices of goods and services.
  • As the standard of deferred payments, which means as a standard of payments contracted to be made at some future date.

The most common characteristics of any form of real money will include:

  • Its general acceptability
  • Its divisibility
  • Its easy trans-portability (credit money issued by banks, central bank or by government has a quality of trans-portability.)
  • Its durability
  • Its ability to be standardized – meaning that money units can all be alike with respect to their size, quality and design.

So far we have looked at the functions and characteristics of money, and will now compare the costs and benefits of it. This means, however, that there must be a range of different money types, and these include:

  • Commodity
  • Fiat
  • Representative

Commodity money is that which is used as money that has an intrinsic value in some other use.
Cost of commodity money:

  • It is an alternate to money in direct exchange of goods and services, like barter system.
  • It requires double coincidence of wants. For example: If we want to purchase a product, we need to find a person who will buy our products and in exchange will give us his products. It involves intolerable amount of efforts.
  • It lacks a common unit of value: The problem here is that a rate of exchange is to be made. The price of each commodity would have to be coated in terms of every other commodity.
  • Suitable system of storing wealth: It has no suitable system of storing wealth. No good can serve as a convenient asset for use in the future if storage of that asset is difficult. It should be portable, not perishable, require little space, and should be acceptable for exchange in other goods.
  • Goods cannot serve as the standard of payment contracted to be made in future.
  • It is very difficult for any good to serve as a standard of deferred payments in case a person borrows something and promises to return the same number of units of the same good at a future date. Such a repayment system involves many problems; the borrower may not be a position to arrange the same goods and the same quantity at the time of repayment.

Benefits of commodity money:

  • Commodity money can bring liquidity in the market by trading all types of products in exchange of any other good.
  • Barter systems lead quite rapidly in trade to several types of goods produced in an economy, and which are being imbued with lots of monetary properties.
  • At the time of emergency, when the country does not have its own currency and generally they adopt the foreign currency, commodity money can be beneficial.

Fiat money is designated as money that is intrinsically worthless. It is not backed by reserve of any other commodities.
Costs of fiat money:

  • It is not backed by reserves of any other commodity.
  • The money supply overtakes economic value when the government produces money more rapidly than economic growth. Therefore, the excess money eventually leads to the inflation in the economy.
  • In reality, the real value of a fiat currency is unclear.

Benefits of fiat money:

  • The money itself is given the value by the government.
  • At the time of war or emergency, government often adopts the Fiat money by exchanging it for the other commodities.
  • It is the legal tender declared by most governments.
  • It is the money without intrinsic value.

Representative money refers to money that consists of a token or certificate made of paper. The use of the various types of money including representative money, tracks the course of money from the past to the present.

Costs of Representative Money:

  • It is defined as a claim on a commodity. For example: gold certificates or silver certificates. In this sense it may be called “commodity-backed money”.

Benefits of Representative Money:

  • Representative money is backed by an underlying commodity. For example: Dollars backed by gold are representative money.
  • It tracks the course of money from the past to present.
  • Governments through history have often switched to forms of fiat money in times of need such as war, sometimes by suspending the service they provided of exchanging their money for gold, and other times by simply printing the money that they needed.

In this case, the money is the main driving point. The money invested into the purchase of private label rights receives a great return in the form of increased traffic and sales generated from the additional material and the additional memberships or other purchases.

Table of Contents:

Introduction

Chapter One: Defining Private Label Rights

Chapter Two: Origins

Chapter Three: How to Use It

Chapter Four: Affiliate Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Five: Pay-Per-Click

Chapter Six: SEO

Chapter Seven: Email Marketing

Chapter Eight: Blogs and Private Label Rights

Chapter Nine: Video Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Ten: Social Networks and Private Label Rights

Chapter Eleven: Niche Markets and Private Label Rights

Chapter Twelve: Internet Marketing and Private Label Rights

Chapter Thirteen: Regulations

Chapter Fourteen: Analyzing Business Cycles

Chapter Fifteen: How Individuals Affect and Impact Distribution

Chapter Sixteen: Components of Private Label Rights in Economic Growth

Chapter Seventeen: How Technology Relates to Growth

Chapter Eighteen: How Trade Relates to Growth

Chapter Nineteen: The Functions of Money

Chapter Twenty: Ownership and Market Structures

Chapter Twenty-One: Integration into the Global Economy

Chapter Twenty-Two: International Trade

Chapter Twenty-Three: Technology and Human Interaction

Chapter Twenty-Four: Making Money

Chapter Twenty-Five: Articles & Blogs

Chapter Twenty-Six: E-books

Chapter Twenty-Seven: Warnings

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